Sunday, October 16, 2011

Enquirer Anti-Intellectualism Sinks to New Depths

Each day, The Cincinnati Enquirer astonishes us with its anti-intellectualism. It is dedicated to perpetuating folksy myths for the benefit of our city's nastier controllers of wealth. Its non-stop harassment of Cincinnati's long-planned modern streetcar project -- peppered with all sorts of libelous episodes -- reached a new low on Sunday, October 16:

Photobucket

This graphic is such a stunner that it needs little commentary (Click Here for a larger version), but it should be pointed out that the train the couple is riding on is NOT a modern streetcar, it's a light rail train. What's more, it's a circa 1990 first generation light rail train of the sort in operation in St. Louis and Baltimore:


Technology has advanced, meaning these boxy type of light rail trains with mixed hi-low cars will never again be manufactured. The Enquirer, of course, did not bother in its half dozen published graphics to include an image of a modern streetcar, such as the one that was displayed on Fountain Square last year at this time:


Instead, they ran this photo of a 1930s-era PCC streetcar:

Photobucket

But look closely: they credited this 60-80 year-old photo to Joseph Fuqua II, the Enquirer photographer who is about 35-40 years old. This hints that one of his photos of the modern streetcar that visited Cincinnati last year was switched out by a bought-and-paid for editor.

4 comments:

  1. Wow, nice catch. I'm glad I'm not there to see their OWS coverage.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I was a little freaked out when I saw that in my paper. (Yes, I still get a Sunday paper delivered.) What a ridiculous image to illustrate a story this paper hammers constantly.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Just wait for the repeat of Issue 9 when Smitherman/Finney complained about the ballot language...with The Enquirer failing to mention that THEY WROTE IT.

    ReplyDelete
  4. that picture is just bizarre
    Why doesn't the Enquirer use pictures of rustic old covered bridges when writing about Ohio River bridges?

    ReplyDelete